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Anger over plans to fell oak tree in Woodbridge

PUBLISHED: 05:30 08 September 2019

The oak tree on Ipswich Road in Woodbridge is under threat if renovation plans are approved. Picture: GEMMA JARVIS

The oak tree on Ipswich Road in Woodbridge is under threat if renovation plans are approved. Picture: GEMMA JARVIS

Archant

There are strong objections to plans to remove a 30 foot oak tree on Ipswich Road.

The oak tree would be cut down to pave the way for a brand new garage on the property. Picture: MULLINS DOWSE ARCHITECTS LTD 2019The oak tree would be cut down to pave the way for a brand new garage on the property. Picture: MULLINS DOWSE ARCHITECTS LTD 2019

The plans to fell the tree have been met with anger after applications were submitted to East Suffolk Council.

The property situated on Ipswich Road is up for sale but proposed renovations have been presented to the council before it is to be sold on.

Part of the plan is to landscape the garden to provide easier access to the premises.

This means, however, the felling of an oak tree thought to be hundreds of years old which has angered residents and the ecological action group, Transition Woodbridge.

Eleven objections have been posted to the council's website so far, however, with no tree preservation order in place to protect it, this mighty oak may get the chop.

Charlie Zakks from Transition Woodbridge said: "It is hypocritical to be outraged about the Amazon rainforests burning down but we must not forget that we are destroying our ecosystems.

"We need to plant trees not cut them down and if the council allow this I think it is disgusting. What happened to the climate change emergency declared recently?"

Woodridge Town Council declared a climate change emergency in July with a promise to improve the town's environment which included planting more trees.

The oak tree is a national woodland treasure and is the inspiration for the emblem of many environmental organisations, including the Woodland Trust. It has also played an important part in English culture - couples were wed under ancient oaks in Oliver Cromwell's time and also featured on the 1987 pound coin.

Cordelia Richman, project manager of the Jetty Lane Project, is also campaigning against the plans and said: "At a time of crisis for the climate and loss of habitat for wildlife, it would be wrong to destroy this tree. The loss of this oak would have a hugely negative impact on this area."

The owners of the property were asked for comment and said: "We believe that it is very important to get feedback from local residents so that possible future changes to the property can take those into consideration".

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