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Film review: Glass

PUBLISHED: 18:35 04 February 2019 | UPDATED: 18:35 04 February 2019

Samuel L. Jackson, James McAvoy and Bruce Willis in Glass  Picture: THE WALT DISNEY COMPANY

Samuel L. Jackson, James McAvoy and Bruce Willis in Glass Picture: THE WALT DISNEY COMPANY

Does Glass provide a satisying ending to the Eastrail 177 trilogy? Mark Goodin reviews.

Sarah Paulson and Samuel L. Jackson in Glass    Picture: THE WALT DISNEY COMPANY Sarah Paulson and Samuel L. Jackson in Glass Picture: THE WALT DISNEY COMPANY

As well as marking something of a return to form for M. Night Shyamalan, one of the biggest surprises about 2017’s Split was that it was a sequel to his subversive superhero thriller Unbreakable (2000).

Now, he brings his Eastrail 177 trilogy to a conclusion with the inventive Glass in which the superhumanly strong David Dunn (Bruce Willis), the multi-personalitied Kevin Wendell Crumb (James McAvoy) and the highly intelligent, eponymous villain (Samuel L. Jackson) find themselves confined to a psychiatric hospital where Dr Ellie Staple (Sarah Paulson) attempts to convince them that their superpowers are not real.

While the film’s action-heavy opening suffers from some seriously clunky, expositional dialogue and a dreadful cameo from the director, it hits its stride once we are planted into the One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest-esque hospital. Shyamalan expertly draws out the suspense and sense of dread both in Ellie’s interactions with her new patients and in Mr Glass’ manipulation of Kevin.

However, the film falters and enters laughable, clichéd territory when Shyamalan ventures outside the institution to focus on David’s son Joseph (Spencer Treat Clark) desperately trying to help his father.

Thankfully, Shyamalan keeps the attention largely on the central three, with an on-form Willis, a scene-stealing McAvoy and a twitchy Jackson injecting a level of pathos into the proceedings as the film hurtles towards its tragic, bittersweet end.

While not as strong as the first instalment, Glass is a thrilling and fitting end to this bold trilogy.

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