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10 things you didn't know about Woodbridge

PUBLISHED: 10:54 20 September 2018 | UPDATED: 14:24 20 September 2018

A sailors view of Suffolk from the River Deben heading towards Woodbridge.
The Woodbridge Tide Mill.

A sailors view of Suffolk from the River Deben heading towards Woodbridge. The Woodbridge Tide Mill.

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No matter how long you’ve been living in or visiting Woodbridge there’s always more to learn.

Woodbridge Tide Mill (Stock Image). Picture: PAUL GEATERWoodbridge Tide Mill (Stock Image). Picture: PAUL GEATER

1. Woodbridge has been home to a Tide Mill since around 1170. For several hundred years it was owned by Augustinian monks before King Henry VIII confiscated it. The current mill is just over 300 years old.

2. Speaking of the Tide Mill, it’s one of only two working examples in the country. The other working mill is in Eling near Southampton.

The Bull Hotel on Market Hill where Lord Tennyson used to stay Picture: ANDY ABBOTTThe Bull Hotel on Market Hill where Lord Tennyson used to stay Picture: ANDY ABBOTT

3. Renowned poet Alfred, Lord Tennyson stayed in The Bull Hotel on Market Hill. The poet laureate stayed there while visiting his friend Edward FitzGerald, another poet who was born in Bredfield and lived in Woodbridge.

4. The Shire Hall has had a number of purposes over the year. Currently it houses Woodbridge Town Council but in the past it has been a court, a corn exchange and even a fire station for a short period.

Shire Hall Woodbridge. Picture: GREGG BROWNShire Hall Woodbridge. Picture: GREGG BROWN

5. If you walk down Burkitt Road then you’ll be able to spot Woodbridge’s former prison. A large stone slab on the front reads ‘correction’. It was built in 1804 and later served as the town’s police station.

6. Most people know that the Steelyard on the Bell and Steelyard pub is one of only two examples in the country. However, did you know that in 1897 it was taken down and loaned to the Victorian Exhibition in London before being returned and re-erected.

7. Woodbridge suffered greatly during the Great Plague of 1664. It is thought that around 300 people in the town died as a result of plague including the master of the then Woodbridge Free Grammar School and some of its pupils.

Burkitt Road in Woodbridge Picture: PHIL MORLEYBurkitt Road in Woodbridge Picture: PHIL MORLEY

8. On August 12 1915 Woodbridge was bombed by German Zepplins. It was part of a raid on the Suffolk and Essex coast which also included Ipswich and Harwich as targets.

9. Want to stay somewhere a bit unusual? You can stay in the former Tricker’s Windmill for the weekend. Or however long you like really its an AirBNB property that has two floors which have been converted for accommodation

The Bell and Steelyard Pub in Woodbridge Picture: KATY SANDALLSThe Bell and Steelyard Pub in Woodbridge Picture: KATY SANDALLS

10. Woodbridge’s waterfront has also been home to some well known visitors in its past as ships for the like of Sir Francis Drake were built in the area.

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